Win This Bike

Win a 1939 Harley-Davidson EL Knucklehead Bobber!

Drawing November 16, 2013!!!!

Win a 1939 Knucklehead Bobber from Wheels Through TimeThis 1939 Harley-Davidson EL Knucklehead Bobber is a beauty….and it could be yours!!!

WTT is proud to introduce the 11th Annual Wheels Through Time Raffle Bike!!!

Get Your Tickets Today!!!

Each year, the Wheels Through Time Museum sets out to bring back to life a true piece of American motorcycle history to be raffled off each November as the museum’s annual fundraiser.  This year’s machine — a beautiful 1939 Halrley-Davidson Knucklehead Bobber — is a stunner, and will be taken home by one lucky winner on November 16th of 2013.

Win a 1939 Harley-Davidson Knucklehead Bobber from Wheels Through TimeCountless hours of both passion and enjoyment went into the restoration of this beauty, and the craftsmanship and attention to detail is evident throughout.  Rebuilt from the ground up by museum curator and founder, Dale Walksler, the ’39 Knucklehead Bobber features Harley-Davidson’s 61 cubic inch overhead-valve powerplant equipped with a four speed transmission, and has all sorts of period accessory “extras”, including Flanders rubber-mounted risers and handlebars, early knucklehead air scoop, cut down rear fender, and so much more.  Finished in stunning black and copper with red striping and gold leaf emblem, this bike overflows with attitude and personality.  Truly a Real School motorcycle, built with real and authentic parts, this 1939 Harley-Davidson EL Bobber is ready for the road… and it could be yours this November 16, 2013!!!

Ticket specials are 1 ticket for $10 and 3 tickets for $20, and our best package gets you 7 tickets for $50, which includes a Free WTT T-shirt and DVD, or a 1-year subscription to American Iron Magazine (7 ticket packages only).

Watch the 2011 Raffle Drawing & Meet the Grand Prize Winner

So be sure to get your tickets today!  Not onoy will you have a chance to win the 1939 Harley-Davidson EL Knucklehead Bobber, but you’ll be supporting the great cause of keeping America’s transportation history up on two wheels for generations to come!

 Remember, Wheels Through Time is a 501c3 Not-For-Profit institution, so all contributions to this years raffle fundraiser are tax-deductible, and help keep us “The Museum That Runs”!!!

Thank You for Your Support!!!

Get Your Tickets, HERE!!!

Welcome to Wheels Through Time

Welcome to Wheels Through Time!The Wheels Through Time Museum is home to the world’s premier collection of rare American Vintage Motorycles.  Located 5 miles from the Blue Ridge Parkway, in beautiful Maggie Valley, NC, this All-American motorcycle museum houses over 300 of America’s rarest and most historic classic motorcycles, with over 24 marques on display, including the likes of Harley-Davidson, Indian, Excelsior, Crocker, Henderson, and much more.  Western North Carolina’s premier museum and tourism attraction features dozens of motorcycle-related exhibits, ranging from board track racers, hillclimbing, and original paint machines to American Dirt Track racing, choppers and bobbers, and one-of-a-kind motorcycles. The museum also annually holds a motorcycle raffle, which helps them continue their mission.

Founded by Dale Walksler in 1993, WTT has become an integral piece in discovering, maintaining, and preserving American motorcycle history.  The collection houses tens of thousands of motorcycle pictures, historic memorabilia, and other motorcycle artifacts, and has been featured in hundreds of motorcycle publications, including American Iron, Cycle World, Cycle Source, and American Motorcyclist to name a few.

WheelsThroughTime.com contains hundreds of motorcycle videos, ranging from Antique Motorcycle Restoration videos to event shows, virtual tours, feature bike shows, and more, and is considered the world’s best motorcycle video website.

Click on the Photo below to see what
“The Museum That Runs” is all about!

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Open the door to the Time Machine!
Check Out “The Time Machine” — Hundreds of on demand
Wheels Through Time Videos, with the click of a mouse!

Welcome to Wheels Through Time

The Wheels Through Time Museum is home to the world’s premier collection of rare American Vintage Motorycles.  Located 5 miles from the Blue Ridge Parkway, in beautiful Maggie Valley, NC, this All-American motorcycle museum houses over 300 of America’s rarest and most historic classic motorcycles, with over 24 marques on display, including the likes of Harley-Davidson, Indian, Excelsior, Crocker, Henderson, and much more.  Western North Carolina’s premier museum and tourism attraction features dozens of motorcycle-related exhibits, ranging from board track racers, hillclimbing, and original paint machines to American Dirt Track racing, choppers and bobbers, and one-of-a-kind motorcycles. Read More…

1954 Cadillac Eldorado Convertible

1954 Cadillac Eldorado Convertible

This car has an interesting history as it was purchased new in Harrisburg, Illinois and paid for by the chic of Baghdad. His son was a student at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois and was killed. The car changed two hands and came into the possession of John Colle in Nason, Illinois. He drove it for a few years and parked it in his house in 1969. The car remained untouched until 1999. I purchased the car from his daughter Joni, and within hours, it was on the road. Eighty plus hours of cleaning were required to bring it to "as new" condition. The car features its original paint, continental kit, and spotlight mounted rear view mirrors.

This is "One Sheik Car" sequence of pictures that include Joni and her stepmother with the car in the house at the Colle residence. This car did not move for thirty years. Joni had fond memories of this car and her father and was involved in seeing the car come to life. John Colle was a collector of many things, but the Cadillac was his pride and joy. After misc. pictures of convertible and removing the car from the house, Rick’s Towing delivered it 15 miles to Mt. Vernon, Illinois. The car still had its 1970 license plates. I took this opportunity to blow the dust out from underneath and three of us installed the battery. Within an hour, Marge Harris and I took the car for a drive. After 88 hours of shining, the car is "AS NEW".

1932 Clobes

1932 Clobes

As far as the world knows, the Clobes Special is the world’s first street rod. The car has a unique history and I sure wish it could talk. The builder of the car, Cletus Clobes, was a multi-talented person. He built his own home; he built his own motorcycle; and he built this car. It has many advanced features including: a dropped and filled axle, a z’ed frame, an adjustable chassis, split hood with locks, concealed radiator cap and gas cap, battery and horn under hood, telescoping mirror, rain gutters, steering column mounted, motometer and on and on and on.

Clobes Special - Previous Owner Cleatus - Hand Made Car

Cletus Clobes

The car was purchased in 1989 out of the home where Cletus lived. It was parked there for over 40 years. The World War II gas ration stickers are still pasted inside on the windshield. The car was sold at a walk-through-the-house sale for $800.00. It changed one hand and came into the possession of Bill Anderson of Hudson, Illinois. Bill called me and said "You’ve gotta have this car”, and I obliged.

The car is in good running order and I’ve used it occasionally, including one trip to Mt. Pulaski, where the car was reunited with old Cletus, as pictured. Cletus was a man of many talents in his younger years. He is known in the music circle’s as a band drummer. Cletus played with Tiny Hill and many other Big Band’s.

Post War Model (WW2) Motorcycles


When the boys came back from the war, motorcycles gave them the freedom they yearned for. Post war sales were strong. Club activity reached new levels and the American Motorcycle Association was thriving. This post war boom was shortlived. By 1952, sales slumped and a new breed of riders emerged. The outlaw biker. This legacy dampened the image of all motorcyclists for decades.

1948 FL Panhead
1949 HOT ROD PANHEAD “REVISED MODIFIED”
This combination proved successful, the profits were put to use in development and by 1936, a new light was on the horizon. Customized during the fifties, this machine resembles Harley Davidson’s “Fat Boy” of the 90’s. Dish wheels, chopped front fender, custom exhaust are all “Revised Modified” items that make this “survivor” truly unique. 

Art Deco Era Bikes

The term “Art Deco” may seem only remotely connected with motorcycles, however, the style and flair of this particular era, lends itself to that glamorous time of American History.

1933 RL
1940 CROCKER
Sales figures indicated this year was low ebb for the two remaining motorcycle manufacturers. Excelsior permanently closed its doors in 1931. These were difficult times in America. Reeling from the Great Depression, Harley Davidson realized survival depended on a new approach. Improved engineering, skilled labor and an updated style recruited new buyers to the market. The dealer network, which had suffered greatly, was supplied with new advertising material to bolster sales.This combination proved successful, the profits were put to use in development and by 1936, a new light was on the horizon.

 

Written by Harry Sucher, motorcycle historian, from his book “The Iron Redskin”: The story of the ill-fated Crocker motorcycle, while an entirely unrelated make of machine, deserves mention in connection with Indian history, as its design was based on Indian lines. Its originator and many of the people connected with its manufacture were at one time or another involved in Indian affairs.  The story of the ill-fated Crocker motorcycle, while an entirely unrelated make of machine, deserves mention in connection with Indian history as its design was based on Indian lines and its originator and many of the people connected with its manufacture were at one time or another involved in Indian affairs. Read More…

Veteran American Bikes

Prior to 1913, there were over 120 manufacturers of motorcycles in America. From coast to coast factories built tens of thousands of machines per year. Development from crude single cylinder machines to somewhat reliable twins came at a rapid pace. These machines were used for recreation, sport, transportation and commercial use. The advent of the inexpensive automobile reduced the number of these companies to a handful by 1920.

1918 HENDERSON
1905 YALE
The Henderson brothers of Detroit were pioneers of the four-cylinder motorcycle production. In late 1917, Ignae Schwin, made the brothers a proposal and purchased the company. His Chicago based operations continued four-cylinder production until 1931.

This original 1918 model is one of the first assembled by the Chicago based firm. It has only 3800 original miles and features several unique options. Enclosed valve covers and an unusual hand oil pump make this example truly unusual

In 1904, George Wyman was the first man to cross America on a motorcycle. He rode a Yale California. His grueling adventure has been well documented. This unrestored model has only slight improvement over the 1904 model Wyman rode.
1909 HARLEY DAVIDSON
1908 INDIAN TWIN CYLINDER

In 1909, Harley Davidson offered four single cylinder models. The twin cylinder was still its prototype stage. The following story by Howard Wagner is considered the latest information about Harley Davidson’s formative years.Established in 1901, in Springfield, Massachusetts, the Indian Motorcycle Company was a leader in the industry from its earliest days. Production of its cylinder model designed by Carl Oscar Hedstrom featured a 38 cubic inch 1 over E twin cylinder motor with a unique intake valve mechanism.

Read More

 

Class C Classic Competition Bikes

Introduced by the American Motorcycles Association (AMA) by its Director, E. C. Smith, Class C racing was intended to inspire the “everyday rider” to compete in a variety of motorcycle racing events. AMA board members were also owners and management of the remaining Big 3 – Harley Davidson, Indian and Excelsior.


1935 RLDR

The development of this class would certainly bolster weak depression era sales offering the manufacturer an opportunity to regain financial stability.

Over a period of years, rule changes allowed professional riders on factory machines to compete as they did under the old class A rules.

The Wheels Through Time Museum displays a significant part of our 60 Plus years of Class C machines. The 7500 sq.-ft. mezzanine is literally a timeline of our dirt track & road racing past.


1937 WLDR

1939 WLDR

1941 WLDR

The Legacy of Ralph Berndt

Teamwork: Leonard & Brad Andres