Wheels Through Time Brings 1918 Harley to Presidential Inauguration

This past Tuesday, January 20, the Wheels Through Time Museum, Maggie Valley’s All-American Transportation Museum and top tourism destination, made its way to Washington, DC for the inauguration of our country’s 44th president. The museum, which was invited to participate in the Presidential Inauguration Parade in November of 2008, would attend the parade both in celebration of the swearing-in of our new president and in tribute to the 90th Anniversary of the 1919 Transcontinental Army Convoy on the Lincoln Highway.

On that cold and windy Washington, DC day, approximately 1.4 million people flooded the U.S. capitol city’s streets in what would become a record inauguration day crowd. Spectators lined 10 deep in places along the 1.5-mile parade route, which started on Pennsylvania Avenue and ended in front of the White House. This year’s parade would mark the largest inauguration parade in recent memory, with over 100 groups participating.

As part of the celebration of the 90th Anniversary of the United States Army’s first transcontinental motor convoy via the Lincoln Highway, the museum fielded a rare 1918 WWI Harley-Davidson sidecar outfit for the parade — a machine identical to the Harley-Davidsons used in the original convoy. "Having the opportunity to participate in a historic event of this magnitude is an outstanding honor," said museum curator Dale Walksler. "It was truly a once in a lifetime opportunity and we were happy to play a part."

Known as the "Main Street Across America" the Lincoln Highway was America’s first transcontinental highway, spanning from New York to San Francisco and stretching through 14 states and 500 cities and towns. It was in 1919 that the United States Army made the sixty-two day trip from Washington, DC to San Francisco, bringing with it over eighty vehicles and almost 300 men, making it the first coast-to-coast trip by a U.S. government entity.

In total, 6 vehicles participated in the 90th anniversary celebration during the parade, including Wheels Through Time’s 1918 Harley-Davidson, the "Spirit of the Lincoln Way" firetruck, operated by the anniversary organizer, Craig Harmon, and a 1917 Ford Model-T pick-up, to name a few. Each of the vehicles had a great reception, and despite their age, conquered the 1.5-mile, uphill journey from Pennsylvania Avenue to the White House without a hitch.

Steve Murphy of Eastern Maryland, operator of the 1917 Model-T pick-up, and a long-time visitor to the Wheels Through Time Museum, was thrilled to be a part of making history. "Being such a big fan of the museum, and of antique motorcycles and automobiles in general, it was great to see Dale again and to both play a role in this year’s inauguration." said Murphy. "I know we’ll have a great time sharing pictures and memories next time we get together."

For more information, visit the museum’s video website, located at www.WheelsThroughTime.com, or call the museum at (828) 926-6266.

Wheels Through Time Brings 1918 Harley to Presidential Inauguration

This past Tuesday, January 20, the Wheels Through Time Museum, Maggie Valley’s All-American Transportation Museum and top tourism destination, made its way to Washington, DC for the inauguration of our country’s 44th president. The museum, which was invited to participate in the Presidential Inauguration Parade in November of 2008, would attend the parade both in celebration of the swearing-in of our new president and in tribute to the 90th Anniversary of the 1919 Transcontinental Army Convoy on the Lincoln Highway.

On that cold and windy Washington, DC day, approximately 1.4 million people flooded the U.S. capitol city’s streets in what would become a record inauguration day crowd. Spectators lined 10 deep in places along the 1.5-mile parade route, which started on Pennsylvania Avenue and ended in front of the White House. This year’s parade would mark the largest inauguration parade in recent memory, with over 100 groups participating.

As part of the celebration of the 90th Anniversary of the United States Army’s first transcontinental motor convoy via the Lincoln Highway, the museum fielded a rare 1918 WWI Harley-Davidson sidecar outfit for the parade — a machine identical to the Harley-Davidsons used in the original convoy. "Having the opportunity to participate in a historic event of this magnitude is an outstanding honor," said museum curator Dale Walksler. "It was truly a once in a lifetime opportunity and we were happy to play a part."

Known as the "Main Street Across America" the Lincoln Highway was America’s first transcontinental highway, spanning from New York to San Francisco and stretching through 14 states and 500 cities and towns. It was in 1919 that the United States Army made the sixty-two day trip from Washington, DC to San Francisco, bringing with it over eighty vehicles and almost 300 men, making it the first coast-to-coast trip by a U.S. government entity.

In total, 6 vehicles participated in the 90th anniversary celebration during the parade, including Wheels Through Time’s 1918 Harley-Davidson, the "Spirit of the Lincoln Way" firetruck, operated by the anniversary organizer, Craig Harmon, and a 1917 Ford Model-T pick-up, to name a few. Each of the vehicles had a great reception, and despite their age, conquered the 1.5-mile, uphill journey from Pennsylvania Avenue to the White House without a hitch.

Steve Murphy of Eastern Maryland, operator of the 1917 Model-T pick-up, and a long-time visitor to the Wheels Through Time Museum, was thrilled to be a part of making history. "Being such a big fan of the museum, and of antique motorcycles and automobiles in general, it was great to see Dale again and to both play a role in this year’s inauguration." said Murphy. "I know we’ll have a great time sharing pictures and memories next time we get together."

For more information, visit the museum’s video website, located at www.WheelsThroughTime.com, or call the museum at (828) 926-6266.

WTT Participates in Presidential Inaugural Parade

On January 20, 2009, the Wheels Through Time American Transportation Museum in Maggie Valley, NC made history once again — this time, participating in the 2009 Presidential Inauguration Day Parade. During the historic event, the museum brought a small fleet of WWI era motorcycles to Washington to participate in a procession celebrating the 90th Anniversary of the transcontinental Army motor convoy on the Lincoln Highway in 1919.

Completed in 1915, the Lincoln Highway was America’s first transcontinental highway, stretching from New York City to San Francisco, CA. Passing through 14 states, 128 counties, and over 500 cities, towns, and villages, the highway was America’s first major monument to President Abraham Lincoln, predating the Lincoln Memorial by over 9 years. The highway, which quickly became known as "The Main Street Across America", was developed to improve interstate travel and to make easier the ability for citizens to travel from the Eastern United States to the Western states.

In late November 2008, Wheels Through Time Museum curator, Dale Walksler, was contacted by Craig Harmon, founder and director of the Lincoln Highway National Museum in Galion, Ohio about participating in the momentous event in January. As part of the parade, Walksler, Harmon, and a host of other participants will ride vintage motorcycles and automobiles in a procession celebrating the 90th anniversary of the United States Army’s first transcontinental motor convoy across the United States. Completed in 1919, the motor convoy began in Washington, DC and ran to San Francisco in an effort to determine how well troops could be moved from coast to coast. Over eighty vehicles made the 62-day trip, and through the rugged journey from east to west, U.S. Army observer Dwight D. Eisenhower, then a lieutenant colonel in the Army, began to develop his plan for an interstate highway system he would later implement during his presidency.

During the parade, sons and grandsons of Captain Arthur Herrington and Lt. Ralph Enos, two of the Army motorcycle pilots who completed the 1919 transcontinental convoy, will be riding along. Both Herrington and Enos had a long relationship with the motorcycle and automotive industries. Herrington, an accomplished racer for Harley-Davidson, worked for the Motor Company both before and after the war, and would later partner with Walter Marmon to create the Marmon-Herrington company, of which he would become president in 1931. Herrington would also create the first prototypes of the Marmon-Herrington Calvary Scout Car — what would later become the "jeep". Enos’ impact on the motorcycling world would be just as profound as that of his contemporary, as he would later go on to manage the Harley-Davidson factory racing team, contributing largely to Mr. Red Parkhurst’s world’s records at Daytona Beach in 1920. Soon after, he would serve briefly as assistant sales manager for the Excelsior Organization before returning to H-D for almost another 15 years, and by 1942, he would become the head of the Army’s motorcycle and bicycle division during WWII.

"Wheels Through Time is extremely honored to take part in such a historic event," said museum curator, Dale Walksler. "Regardless of your political affiliation or involvement, this will be an event remembered for years to come. Again, we’re honored to be a part."

 

Wheels Through Time to Participate in Presidential Inauguration Parade

On January 20, 2009, the Wheels Through Time American Transportation Museum in Maggie Valley, NC will be making history once again — this time, participating in the 2009 Presidential Inauguration Day Parade. During the historic event, the museum will bring a small fleet of WWI era motorcycles, including the pictured 1918 WWI Harley-Davidson Sidecar, to Washington to participate in a procession celebrating the 90th Anniversary of the transcontinental Army motor convoy on the Lincoln Highway in 1919.

Completed in 1915, the Lincoln Highway was America’s first transcontinental highway, stretching from New York City to San Francisco, CA. Passing through 14 states, 128 counties, and over 500 cities, towns, and villages, the highway was America’s first major monument to President Abraham Lincoln, predating the Lincoln Memorial by over 9 years. The highway, which quickly became known as "The Main Street Across America", was developed to improve interstate travel and to make easier the ability for citizens to travel from the Eastern United States to the Western states.

In late November 2008, Wheels Through Time Museum curator, Dale Walksler, was contacted by Craig Harmon, founder and director of the Lincoln Highway National Museum in Galion, Ohio about participating in the momentous event in January. As part of the parade, Walksler, Harmon, and a host of other participants will ride vintage motorcycles and automobiles in a procession celebrating the 90th anniversary of the United States Army’s first transcontinental motor convoy across the United States. Completed in 1919, the motor convoy began in Washington, DC and ran to San Francisco in an effort to determine how well troops could be moved from coast to coast. Over eighty vehicles made the 62-day trip, and through the rugged journey from east to west, U.S. Army observer Dwight D. Eisenhower, then a lieutenant colonel in the Army, began to develop his plan for an interstate highway system he would later implement during his presidency.

During the parade, sons and grandsons of Captain Arthur Herrington and Lt. Ralph Enos, two of the Army motorcycle pilots who completed the 1919 transcontinental convoy, will be riding along. Both Herrington and Enos had a long relationship with the motorcycle and automotive industries. Herrington, an accomplished racer for Harley-Davidson, worked for the Motor Company both before and after the war, and would later partner with Walter Marmon to create the Marmon-Herrington company, of which he would become president in 1931. Herrington would also create the first prototypes of the Marmon-Herrington Calvary Scout Car — what would later become the "jeep". Enos’ impact on the motorcycling world would be just as profound as that of his contemporary, as he would later go on to manage the Harley-Davidson factory racing team, contributing largely to Mr. Red Parkhurst’s world’s records at Daytona Beach in 1920. Soon after, he would serve briefly as assistant sales manager for the Excelsior Organization before returning to H-D for almost another 15 years, and by 1942, he would become the head of the Army’s motorcycle and bicycle division during WWII.

"Wheels Through Time is extremely honored to take part in such a historic event," said museum curator, Dale Walksler. "Regardless of your political affiliation or involvement, this will be an event remembered for years to come. Again, we’re honored to be a part."

Wheels Through Time to Participate in Presidential Inauguration Parade

On January 20, 2009, the Wheels Through Time American Transportation Museum in Maggie Valley, NC will be making history once again — this time, participating in the 2009 Presidential Inauguration Day Parade. During the historic event, the museum will bring a small fleet of WWI era motorcycles, including the pictured 1918 WWI Harley-Davidson Sidecar, to Washington to participate in a procession celebrating the 90th Anniversary of the transcontinental Army motor convoy on the Lincoln Highway in 1919.

Completed in 1915, the Lincoln Highway was America’s first transcontinental highway, stretching from New York City to San Francisco, CA. Passing through 14 states, 128 counties, and over 500 cities, towns, and villages, the highway was America’s first major monument to President Abraham Lincoln, predating the Lincoln Memorial by over 9 years. The highway, which quickly became known as "The Main Street Across America", was developed to improve interstate travel and to make easier the ability for citizens to travel from the Eastern United States to the Western states.

In late November 2008, Wheels Through Time Museum curator, Dale Walksler, was contacted by Craig Harmon, founder and director of the Lincoln Highway National Museum in Galion, Ohio about participating in the momentous event in January. As part of the parade, Walksler, Harmon, and a host of other participants will ride vintage motorcycles and automobiles in a procession celebrating the 90th anniversary of the United States Army’s first transcontinental motor convoy across the United States. Completed in 1919, the motor convoy began in Washington, DC and ran to San Francisco in an effort to determine how well troops could be moved from coast to coast. Over eighty vehicles made the 62-day trip, and through the rugged journey from east to west, U.S. Army observer Dwight D. Eisenhower, then a lieutenant colonel in the Army, began to develop his plan for an interstate highway system he would later implement during his presidency.

During the parade, sons and grandsons of Captain Arthur Herrington and Lt. Ralph Enos, two of the Army motorcycle pilots who completed the 1919 transcontinental convoy, will be riding along. Both Herrington and Enos had a long relationship with the motorcycle and automotive industries. Herrington, an accomplished racer for Harley-Davidson, worked for the Motor Company both before and after the war, and would later partner with Walter Marmon to create the Marmon-Herrington company, of which he would become president in 1931. Herrington would also create the first prototypes of the Marmon-Herrington Calvary Scout Car — what would later become the "jeep". Enos’ impact on the motorcycling world would be just as profound as that of his contemporary, as he would later go on to manage the Harley-Davidson factory racing team, contributing largely to Mr. Red Parkhurst’s world’s records at Daytona Beach in 1920. Soon after, he would serve briefly as assistant sales manager for the Excelsior Organization before returning to H-D for almost another 15 years, and by 1942, he would become the head of the Army’s motorcycle and bicycle division during WWII.

"Wheels Through Time is extremely honored to take part in such a historic event," said museum curator, Dale Walksler. "Regardless of your political affiliation or involvement, this will be an event remembered for years to come. Again, we’re honored to be a part."